Photo
houby:

Mushrooms Series by Sasha Vinogradova

houby:

Mushrooms Series by Sasha Vinogradova

Photo
libutron:

Calostoma cinnabarinum, Blood Mountain, Blood Mountain Wilderness, Chattahoochee National Forest, Union County, Georgia, US | ©Alan Cressler
This fungus, called Stalked puffball-in-aspic, is one of the most unusual fungi yo will see. Calostoma cinnabarinum is a gasteroid fungus (Boletales - Sclerodermataceae). 
In this fungus, the fruiting body is spherical, orange or bright red, about 20 mm in diameter, with a gelatinous, transparent and thin outer layer. Apical peristome has a cross-shaped when fruiting is in its mature phase. When mature, the fungi have a cartilaginous-gelatinous rhizomorphic base, which is dimpled.
As with all members of its genus, C. cinnabarinum is generally considered inedible by field guides. A study of the cultural practices of mestizo descendants of the Otomi people in Tenango de Doria, Mexico, reported that immature specimens of C. cinnabarinum were frequently eaten raw in the past, especially by children. Consumption of the species was no longer commonplace. 
[Source]

libutron:

Calostoma cinnabarinum, Blood Mountain, Blood Mountain Wilderness, Chattahoochee National Forest, Union County, Georgia, US | ©Alan Cressler

This fungus, called Stalked puffball-in-aspic, is one of the most unusual fungi yo will see. Calostoma cinnabarinum is a gasteroid fungus (Boletales - Sclerodermataceae). 

In this fungus, the fruiting body is spherical, orange or bright red, about 20 mm in diameter, with a gelatinous, transparent and thin outer layer. Apical peristome has a cross-shaped when fruiting is in its mature phase. When mature, the fungi have a cartilaginous-gelatinous rhizomorphic base, which is dimpled.

As with all members of its genus, C. cinnabarinum is generally considered inedible by field guides. A study of the cultural practices of mestizo descendants of the Otomi people in Tenango de Doria, Mexico, reported that immature specimens of C. cinnabarinum were frequently eaten raw in the past, especially by children. Consumption of the species was no longer commonplace. 

[Source]

(mycologyから)

Photo
sheishine:

Specimens from Regnum Fungi.
New felt sculptures for a show, Supahcute Science Fair “Art + Science = Magic,” curated by Hana Kim (Supahcute), at Leanna Lin’s Wonderland in Los Angeles, which will open on March 8th, and run through April 27th. 

sheishine:

Specimens from Regnum Fungi.

New felt sculptures for a show, Supahcute Science Fair “Art + Science = Magic,” curated by Hana Kim (Supahcute), at Leanna Lin’s Wonderland in Los Angeles, which will open on March 8th, and run through April 27th. 

Photo
libutron:

Podoserpula pusio | ©James Winder & Michael Pilkington
Commonly known as Pagoda fungus due to the growth shape of the fruiting body, Podoserpula pusio is an uncommon, beautiful little wood-rotting fungus, native to Western Australia.
Fungi - Basidiomycota - Agaricomycetes - Amylocorticiales - Amylocorticiaceae - Podoserpula - P. pusio

libutron:

Podoserpula pusio | ©James Winder & Michael Pilkington

Commonly known as Pagoda fungus due to the growth shape of the fruiting body, Podoserpula pusio is an uncommon, beautiful little wood-rotting fungus, native to Western Australia.

Fungi - Basidiomycota - Agaricomycetes - Amylocorticiales - Amylocorticiaceae - Podoserpula - P. pusio

(mycologyから)

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libutron:

Arthropods are Attracted to Luminous Fungi
Luminescence in some fungi may be present in mycelia or in both mycelia and fruiting bodies. Lights have been described as blue, white, or green depending on the species, and emission intensities vary considerably.
In the forests of Borneo, Mycena (= Poromycena) manipularis are visible at ca. 40 meters, and an Australian species pours forth its emerald green light with sufficient intensity to read. Some North American forms tend to be dimmer. The eye often requires several minutes of dark adaptation before their glows become visible. 
The receiver(s) toward which fungi direct their luminous signals are unknown. Lights have been supposed to lure spore dispersing insects. There has apparently been no conjecture on the benefits mycelia accrue by glowing. The different environments of mycelia and fruiting bodies make it questionable whether their lights are directed at identical receivers or even serve similar functions. 
A study with North America bioluminescent fungus (Mycena sp. and Dictyopanus pusillus), published by John Sivinski (1981), evidence that certain arthropods are more likely to be captured in traps baited with light- emitting mycelia and fruiting bodies than in controls containing fungus-free substrate or dead and dark specimens of luminous species. Several possible interactions between fungi and attracted arthropods are possible.
Attraction of insects to fungal lights does not demonstrate that luring arthropods is the function of the bioluminescence. With this caveat in mind, note that an acceleration in the rate of certain fungus/insect interactions even as an effect of a bioluminescent signal is apt to influence the evolution of luminous fungi.
[Read more]
Photo: Mycena (= Poromycena) manipularis, a species of bioluminescent fungus in the family Mycenaceae, that can be found in Australasia, Malaysia, and the Pacific islands. Credit: ©James Winder & Michael Pilkington

libutron:

Arthropods are Attracted to Luminous Fungi

Luminescence in some fungi may be present in mycelia or in both mycelia and fruiting bodies. Lights have been described as blue, white, or green depending on the species, and emission intensities vary considerably.

In the forests of Borneo, Mycena (= Poromycena) manipularis are visible at ca. 40 meters, and an Australian species pours forth its emerald green light with sufficient intensity to read. Some North American forms tend to be dimmer. The eye often requires several minutes of dark adaptation before their glows become visible.

The receiver(s) toward which fungi direct their luminous signals are unknown. Lights have been supposed to lure spore dispersing insects. There has apparently been no conjecture on the benefits mycelia accrue by glowing. The different environments of mycelia and fruiting bodies make it questionable whether their lights are directed at identical receivers or even serve similar functions. 

A study with North America bioluminescent fungus (Mycena sp. and Dictyopanus pusillus), published by John Sivinski (1981), evidence that certain arthropods are more likely to be captured in traps baited with light- emitting mycelia and fruiting bodies than in controls containing fungus-free substrate or dead and dark specimens of luminous species. Several possible interactions between fungi and attracted arthropods are possible.

Attraction of insects to fungal lights does not demonstrate that luring arthropods is the function of the bioluminescence. With this caveat in mind, note that an acceleration in the rate of certain fungus/insect interactions even as an effect of a bioluminescent signal is apt to influence the evolution of luminous fungi.

[Read more]

Photo: Mycena (= Poromycena) manipularis, a species of bioluminescent fungus in the family Mycenaceae, that can be found in Australasia, Malaysia, and the Pacific islands. Credit: ©James Winder & Michael Pilkington

(mycologyから)

Photoset

explore-blog:

Magical Contamination is a visual archive of the magic of mold. 

( Swiss Miss  Mrs. Easton)

(元記事: explore-blog (mycologyから))

Photo
inspiration-imusam:

Staheliomyces cinctus
Photoset

soliscence:

Milford, MA // Cedar-Apple Rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae) is a fungus that infects the Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana, not actually a cedar) wherever there are apples or crabapples in the same range. The fungus cycles between Juniperus and apple trees from season to season, and the galls on Juniperus are very distinctive in my neighborhood once they mature. The orange spore horns become bigger in the rain and will shrivel and swell with the weather, and some of them get so big they would fill the palm of my hand. If you were wondering, the galls are squishy and slimy when hydrated, and they look a lot less cool once they release their spores and start to decompose. // May 2013

(mycologyから)

Photoset
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libutron:

Fairy tale by Monique van der Hoeven